UNO Home Computer Science Home


Academic Programs


Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

UNO's computer science program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET), 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410) 347-7700. To earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science, a student must acquire 128 credit hours as described below, and must satisfy all of the requirements of the University and the College of Sciences. In addition, the following stipulations must be satisfied:

  1. Before enrolling in a computer science course, a student must have earned a grade of C or better in all computer science courses which are a prerequisite for it. A grade of C or better must be earned in all science courses, including mathematics and computer science, used to satisfy degree requirements.
  2. Computer science electives must be chosen from computer science courses numbered 3000 or above. One of these must be chosen from a list of team-oriented project courses: Computer Science 4125 or 4210 or 4568 or 4621.
  3. Mathematics electives must have a prerequisite of at least Mathematics 2109 or 2112.
  4. The science sequence must be one of: Biology 1073, 1071, 1083 and 1081; or Biology 1073, 1071, and 2014 or Biology 1083, 1081 and 2114; or Chemistry 1017, 1018, and 1023; or Geology 1001, 1002, 1003, 1004; or Physics 1061, 1063, 1062, 1065. (In some cases, comparable courses intended for respective majors may also be acceptable.) Science electives must be in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics, and must include at least three hours in a science other than that of the science sequence. The University requires each student to complete three hours of biology; this requirement may be met through the science sequence, science electives, or free electives.
  5. Foreign language electives must include a six-hour sequence.
  6. At least three hours in social science electives must be above the freshman level.
  7. Computer Science 4000 (Senior Comprehensive Examinations) must be passed by the student by the final semester of studies.

Mathematics 2107, 2108, and 2109 may be substituted for Mathematics 2111 and 2112. Entering freshman not qualifying for Mathematics 1126 must take Mathematics 1125; these courses may be counted toward degree credit.

Department of Computer Science Course Requirements:
Computer Science 1581, 1583
Computer Science 2120, 2121, 2125, 2450, 2467
Computer Science 3102, 3301, 4101, 4311, 4401, 4501
Computer Science 3080, 3090, 4000
Computer Science electives
Total:


    4
  13
  18
    2
    9
  46 credit hours

College of Sciences Course Requirements:
Mathematics 1126, 2111, 2112
Mathematics 2314, 3721
Mathematics electives
Science sequence
Science
Total:


  13
    6
    6
    8
    6
  39 credit hours

Non-College of Sciences Course Requirements:
English 1157, 1158, 2152
Literature
Humanities or Social Sciences
Foreign Language
Social Sciences
Arts
Total:


    9
    3
    3
    6
    6
    3
  30 credit hours

Approved Electives:

  5 credit hours

Grand Total:

120 credit hours

 

Concentration in Information Assurance

The Department offers a declared concentration in Information Assurance. Students who opt for this concentration are required to fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Completion of the following two courses: Computer Science 4621 and 4623;
  2. Completion of one “project-oriented” elective course. The following courses may be chosen for this requirement. Computer Science 4208, 4402, 4460, or 4620. Other courses may be substituted upon approval by the Department;
  3. Completion of one non-technical elective course. The following courses may be chosen for this requirement: Mathematics 4360 (Mathematical Information Theory), Management 4407 (Management of Technology and Innovation), or Political Science 4410 (American Constitutional Law). Other courses may be substituted upon approval by the Department.

 

Concentration in Bioinformatics

The Department offers a declared concentration in Bioinformatics. Students who opt for this concentration are required to fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Completion of the following science sequence in Biology: 1083, 1081, and 2114;
  2. Completion of the following two courses: Computer Science 4567 and 4568;
  3. Completion of Computer Science 4595, or, with permission, Biology 3104, 3453, or 4153. Other “molecular biology/biochemistry” courses may be substituted upon approval by the Department. Depending on the selected course, this may be counted as a “science elective” or as a “free elective:. It should be noted that these upper-level courses may have prerequisite structures involved which may increase a student’s total coursework;
  4. Completion of the following two “project oriented” courses: Computer Science 4587 and 4588. Other interdisciplinary course projects may be substituted upon approval by the Department.

 

Minor in Computer Science

An undergraduate majoring in a department other than Computer Science may earn a minor in Computer Science by completing the following computer science courses each with a grade of C or better: Computer Science 1581, 1583, 2120, 2121, 2125, 2450, 3301, and one three-credit 4000-level course selected from an approved list. (It should be noted that Mathematics 2721 is a prerequisite for Computer Science 2125.) A transfer student must complete a minimum of nine credit hours in required computer science courses at UNO, and these must include Computer Science 2125 and a three credit 4000-level course from the approved list.

 

Honors in Computer Science

An honors program is available to Computer Science majors. Successful completion of the program will result in graduation with Honors in Computer Science. To be eligible for admission to the program, a student must complete Computer Science 2125 and must have a faculty member willing to serve as thesis advisor. The student must also have an overall average of 3.25 or better and an average of 3.5 or better in Computer Science courses. In order to remain in the program, a student must maintain these averages.

In order to complete the program a student must do the following:

  1. Fulfill all graduation requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science;
  2. Have an overall average of 3.25 or better and an average of 3.5 or better in computer science courses;
  3. Earn six credits in Computer Science 3099;
  4. Produce a written honors thesis and conduct an oral defense before a committee consisting of the faculty thesis advisor, at least one other faculty member selected by the department chairman, and a representative of the Honors Program.

 

Undergraduate Transfer Student

A transfer student must complete a minimum of nine credit hours in required computer science courses at UNO, and these must include CSCI 2125 and a three credit 4000-level course from the approved list.


Request Information

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science offers a program of study leading to the degree of Master of Science. The program is designed to be flexible enough to accommodate the needs of two kinds of students: those who have recently completed an undergraduate degree in computer science and want to further their education, and those practicing professionals who want to acquire specific academic experience relevant to their work.

The department also participates in the Ph.D. in Engineering and Applied Science program. Interested students should refer to the beginning of this Graduate Programs in Sciences section for a description of the program, admission criteria, and curricular requirements.

 

Admission Requirements

After acceptance by the Graduate School, admission to the graduate program in computer science will be determined by the department on the basis of undergraduate academic record, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose and Graduate Record Examination scores. Admission to the program generally requires a composite score of least 1000 on the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination, a mathematical background equivalent to Mathematics 2111, Mathematics 2112 and Mathematics 2721, and a computer science background including the equivalent of CSCI 1583, CSCI 2120, CSCI 2125, CSCI 2450, CSCI 3301, and two upper division courses.

Students not meeting these requirements may be admitted to the program on a conditional basis, and must fulfill conditions imposed by the department in addition to the regular requirements for the degree. Students with bachelor's degrees in fields other than Computer Science may be admitted on a conditional basis. Please direct graduate admission enquiries to: .

The department offers both thesis and non-thesis options in the master's program. All candidates for the master's degree must satisfy the following background, breadth, and depth requirements. No course may be counted toward the satisfaction of more than one of these requirements.

  1. Background Requirement: The equivalent of Computer Science CSCI 4401 and CSCI 4501. Students who have not completed this requirement prior to enrollment are required to do so, for credit, as part of their curricula.
  2. Breadth Requirement: Students must take one 6000-level course that counts towards the degree requirements (three semester hours) in each of three different concentration areas, as listed below.
  3. Depth Requirement: Students must take three additional courses that count towards the degree requirements (nine semester hours), of which at least two must be at the 6000-level. All courses must belong to the same concentration area (see list below). This concentration area must be different from the ones chosen to fulfill the breadth requirement.

Courses that are listed as belonging to more than one concentration area will be counted as fulfilling breadth or depth requirements for only one of those areas.

The concentration areas, with specific subdisciplines falling under each area, are given in the following table. A detailed list of courses included in each area can be obtained from the department.

Areas of Concentration and their subdisciplines:

  1. Theoretical Computer Science and Programming Languages

    • Computability
    • Analysis of Algorithms & Complexity
    • Formal Languages and Automata
    • Combinatorics and Graph Theory
    • Formal Semantics and Type Theory
    • Logic
    • Programming Languages
    • Compiler Construction
  2. Systems & Networks

    • Operating Systems
    • Hardware Architectures
    • Parallel and Distributed Systems
    • Networks
    • Protocols
  3. Software Systems

    • Algorithm Design
    • Data Structures
    • Programming Methodologies
    • Software Engineering
    • Distributed Software Engineering
    • Software Architectures
    • Software Components
  4. Information Assurance

    • Defense of information and information systems by ensuring, their availability, integrity, authentication, confidentiality and nonrepudiation
    • Cryptology
    • Computer Security
    • Information Protection
    • Secure Information Exchange
  5. Database Systems and Distributed Applications

    • Data Modeling
    • Database Systems and Distributed Database Systems
    • Data Query Languages
    • Programming and Architectures for the Web
    • Spatial Database Systems
    • Data Mining
    • Mobile Computing
  6. Computer Graphics and Visual Computing

    • Computer Graphics
    • Image Processing
    • Data Visualization
    • Visual Programming Languages
  7. Artificial Intelligence

    • Robotics
    • Computer Vision
    • Pattern Recognition
    • Evolutionary Computing
    • Expert Systems
    • Machine Learning
    • Data Mining

Students completing the master's degree with thesis must maintain a minimum 3.0 average in all courses taken to satisfy the degree requirements, and a minimum 3.0 average in all 6000-level courses taken excluding thesis research. Each student is required to submit an acceptable thesis and give a satisfactory defense of the thesis. Thirty semester hours are required, no more than six of which may be thesis credit. No more than nine hours may be at the 4000 level. Up to six hours may be taken in approved graduate courses outside of Computer Science. Students choosing Information Assurance as their concentration must select the thesis option.

Students completing the master's degree without thesis must maintain a minimum 3.0 average in all courses taken to satisfy the degree requirements, and a minimum 3.0 average in all 6000-level courses taken. Each student is required to give a satisfactory performance in a comprehensive examination covering course work. Thirty-six semester hours are required, no more than 12 of which may be at the 4000 level. Up to nine hours may be taken in approved graduate courses outside of Computer Science.

All graduate students are expected to participate in the weekly departmental seminar.


Request Information

PhD in Engineering and Applied Sciences

The Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering and Applied Science (DENAS) is an interdisciplinary, integrative degree involving faculty from the College of Engineering and the College of Sciences. This program is particularly suited to the emerging trends in the scientific and engineering communities.

Below are listed the general requirements for the degree, which apply to all students regardless of their major department. In addition to these general requirements, students whose principal area is Computer Science must fulfill certain specific requirements defined by the Computer Science Department.

Admissions

Admission to the doctoral program is based on reasonable evidence that the applicant will prove capable of scholarly research on a broad intellectual foundation. All students enrolling in the program must have a Master's degree from an accredited college or university in engineering, physics, mathematics, geophysics, computer science, or closely related field, or be willing to complete course work required in an existing Master's program in one of the participating departments at UNO while pursuing the Ph.D.. Admission decisions will be based primarily on grade-point average, Graduate Record Examination scores, and letters of recommendation. Foreign applicants (non-English speaking countries) must also have a satisfactory TOEFL score.

Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering and Applied Science Degree Requirements

Students enrolled in the program must satisfy all general requirements of the UNO Graduate School. Following are the formal procedural requirements for students to receive the Ph.D. Degree in Engineering and Applied Science.

Ph.D. candidates must complete a minimum of 51 semester credit hours of graduate course work in an approved program beyond the Bachelor's degree, not including dissertation writing. The credit hours may include up to 30 semester hour credits obtained in a Master's degree program, if the area of the Master's degree is relevant to the doctoral program. Up to six of these 30 credits may be for the Master's thesis research. In addition, a doctoral dissertation based on the results of the original research under the guidance of a faculty committee and defended in a public examination is a requirement of the doctoral program. At least 30 semester hours of dissertation credit must be earned.

Departments participating in the program are Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, Computer Science, Geology and Geophysics, Mathematics, and Physics. The student's dissertation advisory committee will consist of at least five members. No more than three can be from any one department. There must be at least one committee member from each of the Colleges of Engineering and Sciences. Program Qualification is administered by the department of the principal advisor(s). It is based on material in a typical departmentalized master's degree program, or equivalent. Courses are chosen with the consent of the dissertation advisory committee. The committee shall consider the interdisciplinary nature of the program when they approve the courses. A minimum of nine credits (three courses) must be taken in each college. A General (comprehensive) Examination will be administered by the dissertation advisory committee. The examination will be based on material in the student's program of study. After passing the General Examination the Ph.D. student is expected to write a dissertation prospectus and defend it before the dissertation advisory committee. After a successful defense and committee approval of the prospectus the student may pursue research leading to the dissertation. (The student may register for a maximum of 12 dissertation credits before successful defense and approval of the prospectus provided that Program Qualification has been successfully completed.) The dissertation should reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the program. There must be a final public defense of the dissertation administered by the dissertation advisory committee.

Financial Aid

Teaching and research assistantships are available to qualified students on a competitive basis.

CSCI Policies for the DENAS Program

In addition to the above general policies for the DENAS program, as published in the UNO Catalog, the Computer Science Department defines specific policies that must be followed by CSCI students in this program.